Mac Miller pounds out a show for Pittsburgh's Yinzers

December 10, 2011 12:00 am
  • Rap phenom Mac Miller of Point Breeze hung out "with some yinzers" Friday night at Stage AE in his first hometown show in more than a year.
    Rap phenom Mac Miller of Point Breeze hung out "with some yinzers" Friday night at Stage AE in his first hometown show in more than a year.
  • Mac Miller packed a lot of energy into his show at Stage AE Friday night.
    Mac Miller packed a lot of energy into his show at Stage AE Friday night.
  • Native son Mac Miller headlines on stage at stage AE.
    Native son Mac Miller headlines on stage at stage AE.
  • Mac Miller at Stage AE.
    Mac Miller at Stage AE.
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Talking to Mikey and Big Bob on Kiss-FM Thursday morning, Mac Miller said, "Can't wait to get home to Pittsburgh, hang out with some yinzers."

The rap phenom from Point Breeze was greeted by a couple thousand yinzers -- wildly excited ones packing the floor shoulder to shoulder -- Friday night at Stage AE in his first hometown show in more than a year.

The last one here was an opening slot for Rostrum labelmate Wiz Khalifa in the same venue, and although he was well-received, it was hard to imagine him coming back to sell out two nights.

A lot has happened in a year. The 19-year-old Allderdice High School grad is finishing his grand 2011 odyssey of 200 shows throughout North America and Europe, during which time he has released a popular mixtape and EP on his way to topping the Billboard charts with his debut album, "Blue Slide Park."

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Success can often breed contempt, so the critical backlash is under way. Trend-setting website Pitchfork gave "Blue Slide Park" a 1.0 out of 10, and a Washington Post critic called his show at the Fillmore Silver Spring "the single worst concert I've been to all year," saying his lyrics didn't amount to much more than "being bored, skipping class, craving fun, beer and weed."

To that, his fans might say, "Yeah, so what's wrong with that?" He even said it himself Friday night.

Fans aren't turning to Mac Miller for spiritual enlightenment, social commentary or musical innovation. Leave that to Kanye and Kid Cudi. He's just a talented, fun-loving kid who's kind of like his fans, and he's pitching an escape from the mad stresses of the adult world and a giddy alternative to angst-ridden gangster rap.

Who else is singing "Life couldn't get better/this could be the best day ever"?

The show opened with that title track from the mixtape, then Mr. Miller and hypeman Tree J jumped out from behind the curtain, under a painted backdrop that whimsically put Frick Park Market right next to the blue slide.

Scott Mervis: smervis@post-gazette.com ;412-263-2576.
First Published 2012-02-09 15:41:28
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